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Stemming the Exploitation of ICT Threats and Vulnerabilities: An Overview of Current Trends, Enabling Dynamics and Private Sector

Stemming the Exploitation of ICT Threats and Vulnerabilities: An Overview of Current Trends, Enabling Dynamics and Private Sector

PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT FUNDAMENTAL TO ADDRESSING THREATS AND VULNERABILITIES TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

UNIDIR report illustrates roles that some technology companies are assuming to shape the behaviours of different actors and the IT market itself.

GENEVA, 28 JUNE 2019 — A UNIDIR report released today identifies current trends in ICT threats and vulnerabilities and highlights some of the worrying dynamics enabling the persistence of these threats and vulnerabilities and their exploitation.

The report, Stemming the Exploitation of ICT Threats and Vulnerabilities: An Overview of Current Trends, Enabling Dynamics and Private Sector Responses, illustrates roles that some technology companies are assuming to shape the behaviours of different actors and the IT market itself. The study questions whether self-regulation and the recent expansion of principled declaratory initiatives involving the technology sector are sufficient to manage the scope and scale of the challenges and risks at hand.

“Technology companies are playing an increasingly important role in national and global governance issues and some companies are gradually assuming the roles and responsibilities that come with increased influence and power,” said Dr. Camino Kavanagh, UNIDIR non-resident researcher and Visiting Fellow at the Department of War at Kings College London. “These roles and responsibilities are complementary to the responsibilities of States, the technology community and other actors. They do not replace them.”

At its 73rd Session, the General Assembly established two processes starting in 2019 examining the international security dimension of cyber and ICT related issues: an Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) open to all Member States and a Group of Governmental Experts limited to 25 States. The OEWG will be the first time that all Member States are invited to participate in discussions on international security and ICTs. The resolution establishing the OEWG specifically calls for consultations with the private sector as part of a multi-stakeholder approach. UNIDIR, in partnership with the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs, will be supporting the work of both processes.

 

ABOUT UNIDIR

The United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) is an autonomous institution within the United Nations that conducts independent research on disarmament and related problems, particularly international security issues. UNIDIR supports Member States, the United Nations and policy and research communities in advancing ideas and actions that contribute to a more sustainable and peaceful world. For more information about UNIDIR, visit: www.unidir.org. Follow UNIDIR on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

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